The Rhode Island Baseball Experience

Promoting Rhode Island Baseball Since 1972

According to their website, The Rhode Island Men’s Senior Baseball League (RISMBL) is “the largest amateur baseball league in Rhode Island with 3 age divisions (30+ 40+ 50+). RIMSBL is an opportunity to shout out loud that classic quote “Age is Just a Number,” while you pitch, hit, run, catch, maybe steal a base, and play baseball well after your high school, collegiate, or perhaps professional baseball career has ended. I have coached against many Little League coaches who continue to play into their 40s and 50s, simply because they love the game of baseball and how the game of baseball makes them feel – Like a Kid again!!!

Over the past few years, I have connected with Frank Ribezzo, who is the commissioner of the RISMBL, as well as attended a few games. Frank and I had a conversation through email this week about the league and its upcoming season.

RIBBE – Frank, great to talk to you. Tell me what’s happening in 2021 with RIMSBL.

FRANK – Thank you for your continued support of our league.  I can tell you that our 32nd season opens up on May 19th.  The regular season should be over around September 13th with playoffs through mid October.

RIBBE – So, you have 3 divisions. How many teams are actually in the league?

FRANK – We have been able to expand to 21 teams across three age divisions this year.  8 in the 30 division, 7 in the 40’s and 6 in the 50’s.

RIBBE – I was able to catch a game last year at Cranston West’s Baseball Field. Where else does RIMSBL play league games?

FRANK – We are back at RIC this year after losing it due to covid last year. We’ve got a bunch of games at Pierce, Sprague, Cranston Stadium, Lischio, Macomber Stadium and Johnston Memorial Park, just to name a few.

RIBBE – Are you rosters full? What if a 30, 40, or 50 year old baseball player was eager to play in RIMSBL?

FRANK – We’re also still able to place new players who are interested in playing.

Always great catching up with Frank of the Rhode Island Men’s Senior Baseball League. They have an outstanding video on their Facebook page that you have to see which showcases what playing in the RIMSBL is all about. If you are interested in going to a game, playing in the league, or supporting a player in the league, you can click on this link – RIMSBL – to be directed to their website. Their website has team information, field locations, player rosters, a message board, and so much more. And their Facebook page is Rhode Island Men’s Senior Baseball League. Good luck to all the players participating in the 2021 season of the Rhode Island Men’s Senior Baseball League.

The Rhode Island/Massachusetts AAU Baseball Spring Classic Tournament is scheduled for this upcoming weekend, May 1st and 2nd. On the official website of New England AAU Baseball, www.neaaubaseball.org,I was able to find information about the Spring Classic, which is now broken up into two tournament dates – this past weekend for Spring Classic #1 and this upcoming weekend of May 1st and 2nd for Spring Classic #2. I was also able to find the roster of teams participating in this weekend’s tournament as well as the teams competing in next weekend’s tournament. Here are the schedules of games to be played on Saturday, May 1st along with the game locations:

Here is a list of Rhode Island based AAU Baseball clubs that will be competing in the Spring Classic #2:

  • 10U
    • Ocean State Outlaws
    • L&M Baseball BUDZ
    • OIS Spartans
  • 11U
    • RI Phillies Elite
    • Ocean State Outlaws
  • 12u
    • OIS Spartans
  • 13U
    • Northeast Reds – RIANNA
    • Ocean State Outlaws – MONAHAN
  • 14U
    • OIS Spartans
    • Ocean State Outlaws

You can find game scores, tournament brackets, and upcoming games for Sunday, May 2nd on the official website of NEAAU Baseball – http://www.neaaubaseball.org. Also, their website has a “places” tab on the schedule page, which shows field locations for the various games. Just click on the places tab, find your field, click on the field and then the highlighted directions. This is a very useful tool in finding the fields on your computer or on your mobile device. Many of the teams competing will be using scoring apps such as GameChanger to record and score the games, so if you can’t make a game, you can use these apps to follow along. Saturday weather looks to be ideal for baseball, so I will be traveling around Rhode Island to capture some live game action and will be posting here and on my social media pages. Good luck to all the players, coaches, and families competing in this weekend’s Spring Classic #2.

Just this morning, I received an update on a recent article I published regarding the 2021 Rhode Island Middle School Baseball season. Jon Devolve, who is a valuable resource with the Rhode Island Principals’ Committee on Athletics, messaged me this morning with an important update on spectators. Here is a snapshot of that message:

“Hi Noel, student-athletes are allowed to have 2 spectators at each game. Here is the specific language from the state:

Guidelines for Spectators – Due to the changing restrictions affecting gathering size limits, and facility guidelines spectators will be limited to 2 parents/guardians per athlete.  Schools/facilities can impose stricter guidelines.  Please see the Reopening RI website for details. http://www.dem.ri.gov/programs/media/documents/ri-sports-summary.pdf

And here is the PDF with the details Jon mentioned:

In addition to the guidelines from the Rhode Island DEM, parents and fans should contact their local middle school offices and administrators to see if there are more specific guidelines for attending games. As more updates, game schedules, and information becomes available, I will be happy to share it with the Rhode Island Baseball community. Good luck to all the players, coaches, and families participating in Rhode Island Middle School baseball in 2021!!! And special thanks to Jon Devolve for keeping me informed so I can keep you informed.

The RI/MA AAU Baseball Spring Classic (1 of 2) Tournament is/was being played in several locations throughout Rhode Island and Massachusetts this weekend. One of them is North Kingstown’s Ryan Park. Ryan Park is located off Oak Hill Rd and is just about 10 minutes from my home in North Kingstown. I am very familiar with the park and nature and dirt trails surrounding the fields, so I was excited to see baseball and fans and others enjoying Ryan Park as much as my family has over the years. On Saturday, I stopped by to watch a tournament game featuring the 12U RI Renegades. I arrived shortly after the game started, around 12:20 or so.

There are several multi-use and softball fields located at Ryan Park. For the Spring Classic Tournament, there were two fields designated for play – Field 1 and Field 4. On Field 1, the RI Rays 12U team was competing against a team from MA. I parked in the lower lot and took the walk in the outfield area of another field, where a softball team was practicing. Across from the softball practice, kids were playing in the playground and families were set up under trees watching their kids play baseball. It was really awesome to see the park so alive with activity. When I finally made it up to Field 4, I could see a nice crowd had gathered around the perimeter of the backstop and along the base lines next to the dugouts.

The weather was absolutely ideal for baseball. Sunny skies, just a few clouds passing by here and there. Temps were climbing into the low 70’s. There was a slight breeze which was comfortable. Nothing like the gale force winds we have been experiencing here lately in Rhode Island. This was a nice breeze, not a nasty, cold, knocking down the umbrella on the deck breeze. The players were playing on a skinned field or dirt infield, which means there is no infield grass between the baselines. There was a portable mound set up because that particular field is designed more for softball with a flat mound, not raised like a traditional youth baseball field would have. The base paths, outfield area, backstop, fencing, 9 players on defense, 2 umpires – everything else resembled a typical youth baseball league field.

As I was writing down some notes and taking photos, I realized that it was about 25 minutes after I had arrived and the RI Renegades were still at bat. The game started at 12:15, I arrived around 12:20, it was now about 12:45, and the Renegades were hitting like crazy. Balls were finding gaps. Balls were hit over the outfielder’s heads. Balls were lined past the infielders. Batter after batter, great swings on the baseball. I was really impressed by these 12U Renegades and the offensive show they put on display for friends and family.

One player I was very happy to spot on the RI Renegades team was Noah Antunes. He was wearing number 28 with his last name “Antunes” on the back of his jersey. I checked the 12U RI Renegades roster on the Tourney Machine app and spotted his name on the roster. A few years back, I attended at “Wiffle at Whipple” tournament at Smithfield Little League’s Whipple Field in support of #noahstrong and was so thrilled to see Noah out there on the field playing baseball. I hope that he is doing well and by the looks of it, he is contributing big time to the success of the RI Renegades team.

The 12U RI Renegades ended up winning the game and are sitting atop the 12U Tournament brackets alongside the RI Rays and two teams from MA at 2-0. With weather iffy and rainy on Sunday, there may be some game delays for the completion of the Spring Classic. You can check game schedules, brackets, and results on the official tournament page at RI/MA Spring Classic Tournament #1.

I had a great visit to North Kingstown’s Ryan Park for the 2021 RI/MA Spring Classic Tournament. Best of luck to the RI Renegades and RI Rays on Sunday, weather permitting.

I love talking baseball and good practices with OPT Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine’s Bert Reid. Bert and his staff have began working with Rhode Island High School baseball players in his various offices throughout Rhode Island over the off season. And more recently, Bert mentioned that he has been on the field working with Pitchers on their arm care. Specifically, Bert mentioned that he had been assisting programs from Middletown, Narragansett, and Portsmouth. He sent me a cut sheet of the warm-ups, dynamic movements, and stretches that he and his staff have been recommending to these student-athletes. I am so thrilled to share this important information with you.

The following photos and descriptions provided are courtesy of Bert Reid and OPT Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine. Here is a snapshot of OPT’s “Baseball Pitcher’s Arm Care” program:

Hangs X 3: Hang onto fence or object overhead; move hips (30 seconds each )

  1. forward and backward
  2. side to side
  3. rotate

Scarecrow Position – Shoulder IR (Internal Rotation) – Use hip driver as (above photo) 3-way, forward/back, side to side, and left/right rotation.

Side lying Internal Rotation – Shoulder out at a 90° angle. Press down until a stretch is felt.

Pec (Pectoral Muscle) Stretch – 1. Move forward and back. 2. Rotate. Do each stretch 10 times.

Reverse Throw using Tubing – Emphasize weight shift forward onto landing leg on the way down. Then, shift weight back onto drive leg with arm as extended as possible and with full extension.

Quick External Rotation – Position tubing at the waist. Shift weight and rotate hips from load leg to lead leg. Emphasize shoulder/scapula retraction (back) and protraction (forward). Player should be moving in a rapid motion during this movement.

Scapular Press with Tubing – Emphasize scapular maximum retraction and maximum protraction with less core and truck weight shift. This movement should be done rapidly for scapular focus and conditioning.

Pitcher’s Crossover Row with Hip Internal Rotation – Emphasize balance and hands/knee rotation to drive hip stability during this movement/exercise.

Special thanks, once again, to Bert Reid of OPT Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine. Bert is a fantastic resource for The Rhode Island Baseball Experience and the entire Rhode Island baseball community. If you have any questions about the stretches and/or movements in this article, here is the contact information for Bert Reid:

There are a number of Major League Baseball® Pitch, Hit & Run­™ competition happening in Rhode Island in the coming weeks. What is a Pitch, Hit & Run competition? According to the official website of the competition, www.mlb.com/pitch-hit-and-run, “a FREE, one-day event for boys and girls ages 7-14 (Competitors compete in four age groups: 7/8, 9/10, 11/12, 13/14. Age is determined as of July 17, 2021.) that is simple to host. PHR is the official skills competition of Major League Baseball® and can be hosted by any organization, league, civic group or set of volunteers in the community. A Host Kit is provided, and the competition is free of charge for participants and hosts. Participants compete in either the baseball or softball division and have the opportunity to advance through three levels of competition: Locals, Team Championships and the Finals during the World Series™.”

The Pitch portion of Pitch, Hit & Run involves a player throwing a baseball 45 feet from a target called the Strike Zone. Players have 6 throws from a pitcher’s mound or chalked area 45 feet from the target. Players score points for hitting any portion of the Strike Zone. At the end of their 6 throws, their points are tallied and recorded.

The Hit portion of Pitch, Hit & Run involves a player hitting a baseball off a batting tee. Simply put, the batter steps up to the tee, puts a good swing on the baseball, and attempts to hit the baseball as far as they can. The best hit of the three attempts is recorded as their score.

The Run portion of Pitch, Hit, & Run involves a player running 120 feet, or from 2nd base to home on a standard youth baseball field. Youth baseball field base paths are 60 feet apart, so a run from 2nd to home plate would be an ideal setup for this portion of the competition. Start at 2nd, touch 3rd, and sprint home. Your time will be recorded as your score for this portion of the competition.

There is a frequently asked question (FAQ) page on the Pitch, Hit, & Run website which explains a lot more about the competition, how you can sign up, the promotional kit you receive from MLB®, and much more. The Rhode Island youth leagues that I found during a search entitled “Find A Competition” are:

  • Apponaug Cal Ripken/Babe Ruth – Saturday May 1st – Jim Tweed; (401) 369-0395; jtweed77@cox.net
  • Coventry Little League – Saturday, April 24th – Raena Blumenthal; (401) 822-9107; rblumenthal@coventryri.org
  • Block Island Recreation – Saturday May 1st – David Sniffen ; (401) 466-3223; recreation@new-shoreham.com
  • North Providence Little League – Sunday, May 2nd – Sal Piccirillo; (401) 767-6225; hoyas96@msn.com
  • Portsmouth Little League – Saturday, April 24th – Robert Campion; (401) 297-7112; campionpllvp@gmail.com
  • Narragansett Little League – Saturday, May 1st – Tyler Hoxsie ; (401) 793-0833; thoxsie@narragansettri.gov

You can search by date, zip code, or program name to find a competition in your area. I have included the contact names and information for the leagues and locations that I found on my Rhode Island search. It is best to contact these individuals directly to learn more about field locations, times of the competitions, safety procedures, and how you can sign up your youth baseball player.

Good luck to all the players participating in these Rhode Island based MLB® Pitch, Hit & Run™ competitions this Spring. And feel free to share any photos, videos, and/or results with me so I can post to my social media pages.

The Rhode Island/Massachusetts AAU Baseball Spring Classic Tournament is scheduled for this upcoming weekend, April 24th and 25th. On the official website of New England AAU Baseball, www.neaaubaseball.org,I was able to find information about the Spring Classic, which is now broken up into two tournament dates – this weekend for Spring Classic #1 and the weekend of May 1st and 2nd for Spring Classic #2. I was also able to find the roster of teams participating in this weekend’s tournament as well as the teams competing in next weekend’s tournament. Here are the schedules of games to be played on Saturday, April 24th along with the game locations:

Here is a list of Rhode Island based AAU Baseball clubs that will be competing in the Spring Classic #1:

  • 9U
    • Northeast Reds – Fernandez
    • Northeast Reds – Coro
    • Ocean State Outlaws
    • RI Rays
  • 10U
    • RI Rays
    • Upper Deck Stone Crabs
    • ATC Baseball Club
    • New England Jaguars
    • OIS Spartans
  • 11U
    • New England Jaguars
  • 12u
    • RI Rays
    • RI Renegades
  • 13U
    • Northeast Reds
    • RI Rays
  • 14U
    • Scorpions Baseball
    • RI Rays
    • ATC Baseball Club
    • Ocean State Outlaws Daley
    • RI Nationals

You can find game scores, tournament brackets, and upcoming games for Sunday, April 25th on the official website of NEAAU Baseball – http://www.neaaubaseball.org. Also, their website has a “places” tab on the schedule page, which shows field locations for the various games. Just click on the places tab, find your field, click on the field and then the highlighted directions. This is a very useful tool in finding the fields on your computer or on your mobile device. Many of the teams competing will be using scoring apps such as GameChanger to record and score the games, so if you can’t make a game, you can use these apps to follow along. Saturday weather looks to be ideal for baseball, so I will be traveling around Rhode Island to capture some live game action and will be posting here and on my social media pages. Good luck to all the players, coaches, and families competing in this weekend’s Spring Classic #1.

May is typically a very busy month in the Rhode Island Baseball Experience calendar. The Rhode Island Interscholastic League (RIIL) has posted the Spring 2021 schedule and as of this past Monday, pitchers and catchers are allowed to report to their respective high schools to begin trying out. According to the RIIL, Rhode Island High School baseball season begins May 7. Most Rhode Island youth recreation baseball leagues, such as Little League® and Cal Ripken, begin the month of April with “Field Days”, parades, Opening Days, and then start playing regulation games in May. By May. many travel, showcase, and AAU organizations have played Spring baseball games and some have even competed in or will compete in regional tournaments. The various Rhode Island collegiate baseball teams, some of whom have been playing since February, are still playing baseball in April and May. And I just got word yesterday that the Spring, 2021 Rhode Island baseball calendar is about to get a lot busier.

For the past few weeks, I have been in contact with Jon Devolve of RIPCOA, the Rhode Island Principals’ Committee on Athletics. Jon has been extremely helpful and informative about the possibility of a 2021 Spring Season for Rhode Island Middle School baseball. During a follow up email to Jon, he stated that “Yes, there will be a season consisting of 6 Divisions with each school scheduled to play 10 games within their respective divisions. There will be no playoffs this year which is similar to what the other (Rhode Island) Middle School sports have done over the course of this year.” I asked Jon about the timing of the season, when would it start. He responded, “the season starts May 3, with teams being allowed to practice and games to follow shortly thereafter.” In years past, I have utilized the RIPCOA website to see schedules of games. You can access that website via this link – RIPCOA. I asked Jon to clarify the statement regarding “no playoffs,” asking him will there be a championship game or will the team with the winning record be crowned RI state champ? His reply was “there are no playoffs or championship this year.” Finally, I inquired about fans attending games. Jon’s response was “fans is up to the (Rhode Island) Department of Health and as of now, I am not sure we will allow any but that could change.”

So to summarize, there will be a 2021 Rhode Island Middle School baseball season. The season starts May 3rd with schools being allowed to hold practices and then a game schedule to follow. There will be 6 Divisions (up from 3 (Central, Northern, Southern) in previous years) and each school will play 10 games within their respective division. At the conclusion of the 10 game schedule, there will be no playoffs and no championship game. Fans, parents, family members, friends of the team – check with the Rhode Island Department of Health guidelines on attending outdoor events in May. And I encourage you to check with your local Rhode Island Middle School faculty and safety officers regarding attendance to see live games. There may be some live streaming or online application such as GameChanger or Tourney Machine that will score the games so you can follow along at home or at work. And as May 3rd approaches, you can check the official website of Rhode Island Middle School sports, like baseball, by clicking this link – RIPCOA – to find game schedules, standings, game locations, and much more.

Special thanks to Jon Devolve of the Rhode Island Principals’ Committee on Athletics for sharing this great news about the 2021 Rhode Island Middle School baseball season. Good luck to all the players, coaches, families, and schools participating.

Saturday, April 17th, two Rhode Island collegiate baseball teams squared off in a doubleheader at Newport’s Reynolds Field. The home team, Newport’s Salve Regina University played host to Bristol’s Roger Williams University. I had circled this game (doubleheader) on my calendar when the two teams posted their Spring 2021 schedules about a month ago. A Rhode Island school vs a Rhode Island school, both with tons of local Rhode Island baseball talent, that is a great story, I thought. However, a lot of colleges and universities are not allowing spectators to see live games on their campuses. Each Rhode Island school, college, and university has fairly similar policies on safety protocols – social distancing, mask wearing, CDC guideline procedures – and then has more specific school policies on campus spectators. I want to attend every game I can, but safely and within the guidelines of the school, the college, the organization. So, I emailed/reached out to Coach Eric Cirella of Salve Baseball who then put me in contact with Ed Habershaw, Sports Information Director at Salve Regina University.

Ed phoned me and left me a detailed voicemail on Thursday to let me know that I could attend the game, but there was a “no fan” policy in effect at Salve Regina for their home baseball games. Parking in front of Reynold’s Field was not permitted, so I would have to find parking on the two streets that form the perimeter of the field – Shepard Ave and Lawrence Ave. Also, fans would not be allowed inside the field area, in the bleachers, next to the dugouts, or along the grassy areas of the foul lines. I was allowed to view the game along the perimeter of the field, not inside it. I phoned Ed and voiced my okay to Salve’s policies and mentioned that I would definitely stop by on Saturday and stay to the perimeter of the field. Since there were two games on Saturday, 12 noon and 3, and with the weather being very iffy for baseball around 12, I decided to attend the 3 pm game.

I took the short drive from my home in North Kingstown, over the Jamestown then Newport Bridge, through Downtown Newport, passed Cardines Field, up to Bellevue Ave, passed the International Tennis Hall of Fame, then left on Shepard Ave and found a nice parking spot just a short walk to Reynolds Field. Newport is one of my favorite cities in the entire USA and I just love visiting and seeing all the historical landmarks and uniqueness. As I walked up to Reynolds, I could hear the sounds of baseball, a PA system was playing in between inning music, and the faint chatter of a few fans. I was so excited to be at Reynolds to catch this game and as I got to the entrance of the field, I stepped toward the moss covered stone wall to take my first game photos. “Excuse me, there are no fans allowed on this side of the street, can you please move back. Thank you,” said one of the student attendants at the front entrance area. It was then when I spotted the “No Spectator” signs lining the perimeter of the field, as Ed Habershaw had mentioned. “My fault,” I apologized to the student and moved back to the street. I turned to see a few fans on top of a wall across the street from the field and a few other fans who had found a space under a tree, also across the street. I couldn’t really see much from where I was so I decided to make my way around the perimeter of the field.

Reynolds Field is slightly raised up from street level, so this presented me with a bit of challenge viewing wise. I was able to catch some of the game action from about the first base, short right field area. Again, standing on Shepard Ave and adhering to the “no spectator” policy signs that lined the stone wall perimeter. The first base dugout blocked my view of the batter, but I was able to see the infielders and pitcher. And I was really excited to see North Kingstown’s and Salve student-athlete Patrick Maybach on the mound and to watch him throw. Tall, left handed Pitcher who is the all-time strikeout leader for Salve Regina University Baseball. Wow, what an accomplishment.

As I walked to the right field corner perimeter and made a left onto Lawrence Ave., I spotted a number of fan pockets along the stone wall. There was a pocket of students jawing at the opposing players and then yelling encouragement to their home team. There was a section of parents who had gathered around the centerfield area of the stone wall perimeter. And across the street, there were a few parents up on top of walls and in their cars. I stopped to chat with a few of the parents, who were very excited for Spring baseball but rather disappointed that they had to watch from so far away. I would ballpark their viewing spot to be about 400 feet from home plate, so it definitely was a challenging spot to view the game action. I found a spot nearby and took this video:

I left the parent fan section and continued walking up Lawrence Ave to the corner of the stone wall. Actually, from this spot in just about dead center field, I got the best view of the game. I could see the field, the American Flag was waving proudly next to me, I could see the bullpen area behind the left field fence. I watched a few innings from this spot on the stone wall, sitting with my feet dangling over the side, notebook next to me. The skies in Newport had started to clear up and the sun was shining brightly. The weather had gone from rainy and icky to pleasant and seasonal. I was really loving this view of Reynold’s Field.

On my way back down Lawrence Ave, I stopped to say good-bye to the parents and wished them and their players well. As a parent, I can certainly understand their frustration over not being closer to the game action. Watching a game in the bleachers behind home plate or along one of the baselines is ideal for a baseball fan and parent. Watching it online or 400 plus feet away doesn’t have the same personal feeling or affect, I get it. Salve Regina University, like some many schools, businesses, and organizations has an obligation to protect its student-athletes, its coaches, its faculty, its University, and the health/wellness of its visitors to the campus. These “No Spectator” policies are not meant to be personal or negative, in my opinion. They are put in place with the health/wellness and safety of everyone who attends these baseball games. My hope is that we can all work through these times in a positive manner so that these “no spectator” games become a thing of the past.

As I walked up Shepard Ave towards the front entrance of the field, I once again spotted a few students atop a wall across the street from Reynolds Field. I stopped to chat with them about their view and asked them to take a photo of what they saw. As with the views I encountered, they mentioned that their view wasn’t perfect, there were some obstructions in the way, but it was pretty cool overall. Here is a photo of their view and their spot:

Despite the obstructed views and the “no spectator” policy, I had a fantastic visit to Reynolds Field to watch Salve Regina play Roger Williams. I got to watch North Kingstown’s Patrick Maybach pitch. I caught some of the game action from various spots along the stone wall perimeter. I got a great vantage point in center field next to the American Flag. I chatted with some of the students and parents who attended the game, all along the perimeter of the field and obeying the “no spectator” policies laid out by Salve Regina University. The weather, which was really lousy in the morning, was quite pleasant for my time at the game with sunny skies and wispy clouds and just a light breeze. So, I couldn’t sit in the stands. No problem! I still got to experience the game of baseball on a beautiful Spring afternoon in Newport, safely and within the guidelines of Salve Regina University. And that is why it was a fantastic Rhode Island Baseball Experience.

By the way, the two teams split the doubleheader on Saturday. Roger Williams University won Game 1, 4-2. Salve Regina University won Game 2, 4-3. If you want to learn more about the two Rhode Island collegiate teams and view their upcoming game schedules, here are links to their baseball pages:

Salve Regina University Baseball

Roger Williams University Baseball

Positive Coaching Alliance (PCA) is a national sports mentoring and coaching advisory organization whose goal is to “be a catalyst for a positive youth sports culture in all communities across the U.S. PCA works with players, coaches, families, and organizations (large and small) to develop positive youth sports development and good practices on and off the field. I attended an informational session a few seasons back hosted by PCA Certified Trainer Chris Fay, who presented an excellent slideshow of the Positive Coaching Alliance philosophy of youth development in sports. Chris and I have stayed in contact over the years and he recently sent me an email regarding an upcoming PCA information session. Here is the information from that email:

PCA AND THE RED SOX FOUNDATION PRESENT

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME: 

ADVANCED COACHING WORKSHOP ON LEADING

PRACTICES AND GAMES TO BUILD A POSITIVE, WINNING CULTURE

Rhode Island Baseball Coaches: Thursday, April 29th at 8pm (simple registration required)

Dynamic, interactive workshops for youth baseball coaches designed to tackle the game’s biggest challenges, including:

  • Developing a Positive Team Culture
  • Running Effective and Efficient Practices
  • Managing Common In-Game Situations
  • Teaching the Mental Side of the Game

Positive Coaching Alliance trainers will share research-based, field-tested tips, tools, and best practices, to help coaches build a positive winning culture.  Space is limited to 100 coaches per session.  Please register for the (Rhode Island) workshop via the link below. All workshops will be via Zoom.

Workshop Dates & Times:

  •  Rhode Island: Thursday, April 29th at 8pm (Register)   

There will be a drawing at the end of each session for an autographed Red Sox baseball.  Each workshop is limited to 100 coaches.  If you register, please be sure to attend as we expect these sessions to fill quickly and be extremely popular.

We hope to see your league represented on April 29th!

Questions? Contact Chris Fay at chris_fay@positivecoach.org or 857-225-1889

If you click on the highlighted words “simple registration required” or “Register” above, you will be redirected to the page for registering for this PCA Zoom meeting. And definitely check out the official website of Positive Coaching Alliance at www.positivecoach.org. Please share this with your league’s administrators and any coaches interested in learning how to develop a positive team culture for your baseball organization.